El Goog’s Got a Gun, Man Leaves Baby to Catch’em All, Scientists Print a Cornea

Yeah, we won't learn until it's too late.

Yeah, we won’t learn until it’s too late.

I hope you had a great Memorial Day weekend!

Mine was alright, pretty busy, lots of late nights. But if it’s Thursday morning, it’s time to point and laugh at the latest technology news, and we have some good stories for First News 570. You can always listen LIVE and hear me and Mark Starling talk trash about tech.

OK GOOGLE, FIRE
Artist Alex Reuben decided to try something different with Google Assistant. Instead of asking Assistant for directions or order a pizza, he instructed Google Assistant to fire a gun. And Google Assistant dutifully did. Now, this isn’t necessarily AI, but really programming and an impressive rig to pull the trigger. But it does raise some questions about what limits, if any, we should put on artificial intelligent software. In real terms, Reuben still pulled the trigger and not the AI, but remember these machines think. Honestly, I don’t think we’ll seriously explore limitations on AI until it’s too late. But until then, we can use Google Assistant to shoot up apples.
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MAN LEAVES BABY DANGLING FROM BALCONY BECAUSE HE HAD TO CATCH THEM ALL
I know we usually talk about tech on this program, but this news item was catalyzed by GPS, augmented reality, AI frameworks, and the need to catch Pokemon. On Tuesday, a little boy was found dangling from a Parisian balcony while his father went out shopping, but was delayed because he wanted to catch Pokemon. While others were gaping up at the scene, Mamoudou Gassama, a Mali immigrant scaled the building earning himself the title Spider-man. I actually thought Pokemon was out of favor.
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SCIENTISTS 3D PRINT WORLD’S FIRST HUMAN CORNEA
The cornea is the first lens light passes through human eyes on its way to the retina. If your cornea is damaged, you could suffer blindness or distorted vision. Two Newcastle University scientists have successfully 3D printed a human cornea using human cells. Previously, corneas were replaced using lenses from donors. To print these artificial corneas the scientists devised a gooey ink consisting of alginate and stem cells to create the lens. The technique still requires a donor cornea, but instead of swapping a donor cornea 1-for-1, this new 3D printing technique can produce up to 50 corneas. As a parent with a child who is missing a lens in one eye, this news is fantastic.
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